Keyword Density

Keyword density is an indicator of the number of times the selected keyword appears in the web page. But mind you, keywords shouldnt be over used, but should be just sufficient enough to appear at important places. If you repeat your keywords with every other word on every line, then your site will probably be … Continue reading Keyword Density

Keyword density is an indicator of the number of times the selected keyword appears in the web page. But mind you, keywords shouldnt be over used, but should be just sufficient enough to appear at important places.

If you repeat your keywords with every other word on every line, then your site will probably be rejected as an artificial site or spam site.

Keyword density is always expressed as a percentage of the total word content on a given web page.

The accepted standard for a keyword density is between 3% and 5%, to get recognized by the search engines and you should never exceed it.

Remember, that this rule applies to every page on your site. It also applies to not just to one keyword but also a set of keywords that relates to a different product or service. The keyword density should always be between 3% and 5%.

Simple steps to check the density:
Copy and paste the content from an individual web page into a word-processing software program like Word or Word Perfect.
Now select the Find function on the Edit menu. Go to the Replace tab and type in the keyword you want to find. Replace that word with the same word, so you dont change the text.
When you complete the replace function, the system will provide a count of the words you replaced. That gives the number of times you have used the keyword in that page.

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Net Neutrality: Not So Neutral?

Many consumers are not feeling neutral about net neutrality-the idea that all content streaming in to the Internet should be treated equally.

The words “net neutrality” may sound fair enough, but what this really means is anything but neutral-if net neutrality legislation passes Congress, the companies that are developing innovative new technology for the Internet and the consumers who want to enjoy it will not be treated fairly.

Lobbyists for “net neutrality legislation” are currently asking Congress to pass a bill that will-in essence-stifle innovations such as Internet-based cable TV programming and high-speed broadband networks that are currently being developed by companies such as Verizon and AT&T.

The legislation would force Internet service providers to offer the same speed to Internet companies regardless of the content. So a big business sending out video content would be charged the same as an individual blogger using less bandwidth. It only makes sense that Internet providers be able to set prices based on bandwidth use.

Everyone else-consumers, businesses, broadband providers and the government-must pay a competitive price for the bandwidth they use and for additional features like mobility.

The legislation is a lobbying effort promoted by Web site interests, e-commerce sellers and bloggers who want special government treatment, just for them-one government-set broadband price, with special rates and conditions that consumers don’t get.

In essence, net neutrality is just special-interest legislation, made to sound less self-serving.

Charging companies such as Google and Amazon for their use of the network could help fund new innovations that will one day benefit consumers.

Net neutrality could result in a slower, less responsible Internet; higher broadband prices and taxes for consumers; less diversity in the broadband department; slower broadband deployment to all Americans; and less privacy, because net neutrality would require more government monitoring and surveillance of Internet traffic.

Cisco CCNA / CCNP Certification: OSPF E2 Vs. E1

Cisco CCNA / CCNP Certification: OSPF E2 Vs. E1 Routes

OSPF is a major topic on both the CCNA and CCNP exams, and it’s also the topic that requires the most attention to detail. Where dynamic routing protocols such as RIP and IGRP have only one router type, a look at a Cisco routing table shows several different OSPF route types.
R1#show ip route
Codes: C – connected, S – static, I – IGRP, R – RIP, M – mobile, B – BGP
D – EIGRP, EX – EIGRP external, O – OSPF, IA – OSPF inter area
N1 – OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 – OSPF NSSA external type 2
E1 – OSPF external type 1, E2 – OSPF external type 2, E – EGP
In this tutorial, we’ll take a look at the difference between two of these route types, E1 and E2.
Route redistribution is the process of taking routes learned via one routing protocol and injecting those routes into another routing domain. (Static and connected routes can also be redistributed.) When a router running OSPF takes routes learned by another routing protocol and makes them available to the other OSPF-enabled routers it’s communicating with, that router becomes an Autonomous System Border Router (ASBR).
Let’s work with an example where R1 is running both OSPF and RIP. R4 is in the same OSPF domain as R1, and we want R4 to learn the routes that R1 is learning via RIP. This means we have to perform route redistribution on the ASBR. The routes that are being redistributed from RIP into OSPF will appear as E2 routes on R4:
R4#show ip route ospf

O E2 5.1.1.1 [110/20] via 172.34.34.3, 00:33:21, Ethernet0

6.0.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets

O E2 6.1.1.1 [110/20] via 172.34.34.3, 00:33:21, Ethernet0

172.12.0.0/16 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks

O E2 172.12.21.0/30 [110/20] via 172.34.34.3, 00:33:32,
Ethernet0

O E2 7.1.1.1 [110/20] via 172.34.34.3, 00:33:21, Ethernet0

15.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets

O E2 15.1.1.0 [110/20] via 172.34.34.3, 00:33:32, Ethernet0

E2 is the default route type for routes learned via redistribution. The key with E2 routes is that the cost of these routes reflects only the cost of the path from the ASBR to the final destination; the cost of the path from R4 to R1 is not reflected in this cost. (Remember that OSPF’s metric for a path is referred to as “cost”.)
In this example, we want the cost of the routes to reflect the entire path, not just the path between the ASBR and the destination network. To do so, the routes must be redistributed into OSPF as E1 routes on the ASBR, as shown here.
R1#conf t

Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.

R1(config)#router ospf 1

R1(config-router)#redistribute rip subnets metric-type 1

Now on R4, the routes appear as E1 routes and have a larger metric, since the entire path cost is now reflected in the routing table.
O E1 5.1.1.1 [110/94] via 172.34.34.3, 00:33:21, Ethernet0

6.0.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets

O E1 6.1.1.1 [110/100] via 172.34.34.3, 00:33:21, Ethernet0

172.12.0.0/16 is variably subnetted, 2 subnets, 2 masks

O E1 172.12.21.0/30 [110/94] via 172.34.34.3, 00:33:32, Ethernet0

O E1 7.1.1.1 [110/94] via 172.34.34.3, 00:33:21, Ethernet0

15.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets

O E1 15.1.1.0 [110/94] via 172.34.34.3, 00:33:32, Ethernet0

Knowing the difference between E1 and E2 routes is vital for CCNP exam success, as well as fully understanding a production router’s routing table. Good luck in your studies!